The First easter

Discuss either theological doctrines, ideas about God, or Biblical criticism. I don't want any debates about creation vs evolution.

Moderator: Metacrock

Forum rules
(1) be interesting (2) be nice.

Re: The First easter

Postby Metacrock on Mon Mar 06, 2017 5:07 am

SayaOtonashi wrote:But the resurrection celebration was part of the early church?



the belief was,no sure about celebration.
Have Theology, Will argue: wire Metacrock
Buy My book: The Trace of God: Warrant for belief
User avatar
Metacrock
 
Posts: 9924
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 8:03 am
Location: Dallas

Re: The First easter

Postby Metacrock on Mon Mar 06, 2017 5:11 am

http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/history-of-easter

The exact origins of this religious feast day’s name are unknown. Some sources claim the word Easter is derived from Eostre, a Teutonic goddess of spring and fertility. Other accounts trace Easter to the Latin term hebdomada alba, or white week, an ancient reference to Easter week and the white clothing donned by people who were baptized during that time. Through a translation error, the term later appeared as esostarum in Old High German, which eventually became Easter in English. In Spanish, Easter is known as Pascua; in French, Paques. These words are derived from the Greek and Latin Pascha or Pasch, for Passover. Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection occurred after he went to Jerusalem to celebrate Passover (or Pesach in Hebrew), the Jewish festival commemorating the ancient Israelites’ exodus from slavery in Egypt. Pascha eventually came to mean Easter.
Have Theology, Will argue: wire Metacrock
Buy My book: The Trace of God: Warrant for belief
User avatar
Metacrock
 
Posts: 9924
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 8:03 am
Location: Dallas

Re: The First easter

Postby Metacrock on Mon Mar 06, 2017 5:14 am

https://www.gci.org/jesus/celebrating


By the middle of the second century, different dates had emerged in different Christian communities for the annual celebration of the resurrection of Jesus.

The traditions of some Christians in Asia Minor was to have their annual celebration on the same calendar date each year (the Jewish date of Nisan 14). They ended a period of fasting on Nisan 14 and celebrated the Lord’s resurrection. These communities claimed to have received this tradition from the apostle John.

Most Christians outside of Asia Minor had their own early tradition regarding the celebration of the resurrection of Jesus. This was based on the Roman calendar, rather than on the Jewish calendar. The tradition of most Christians from the second century forward was to have their annual celebration of the resurrection of Jesus on a Sunday, near the time of the spring equinox. They claimed to trace their tradition to Peter and Paul.

Eventually discussion arose between those Asian churches that followed the Nisan 14 tradition (known in church history as Quartodecimans [fourteeners]) and the rest of Christianity, which followed the Western tradition, as to how best to determine the date for the Christian celebration of the anniversary of the Lord’s resurrection.

Around A.D. 154, Polycarp, bishop of the church at Smyrna in Asia Minor, visited Anicetus, bishop of the church at Rome. They discussed their different practices, and each recognized that the other had a legitimate tradition. They agreed to respect one another’s customs.

A generation later, about A.D. 190, Victor, bishop of Rome, tried to impose the Western tradition on the churches in Asia Minor that still followed the Nisan 14 tradition. Polycrates, bishop of Ephesus, resisted this, and his appeal to fellow Christians for tolerance was supported by some Western bishops, including Irenaeus, bishop of Lyons in Gaul (modern France), even though these bishops did not follow the Nisan 14 tradition. Victor was persuaded not to insist, and the two traditions regarding the resurrection celebration continued together for another 150 years (Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History, chapter 24).

The council of Nicea (in Asia Minor) resolved the differences in A.D. 325. In the interest of uniformity, the Council decreed that the churches of Asia Minor would abandon the Nisan 14 tradition and adopt the majority tradition, that of the Western churches. Henceforth all Christian churches would be expected to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus on the Sunday following the full moon after the equinox of March 21. The practice of celebrating the resurrection of Jesus on Nisan 14 persisted for a while in a few areas of Asia Minor.

Both ways of understanding the date for celebrating this festival trace back to apostolic traditions. One focused on the day of the month (as determined by a Jewish calendar). The other traditional observance, known today in English-speaking nations as Easter (nations using French, Spanish, Italian and Greek still refer to this observance of the resurrection of Jesus as Passover), focused on a day of the week determined by the Roman calendar.

The Roman calendar, since its reform by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582, is the basis of the calendar we use today. To continue the Nisan 14 tradition today is to follow an ancient Christian tradition based on a Jewish liturgical calendar. But there is also something to be said for celebrating the crucifixion and resurrection of our Lord at the same time, measured by the same calendar, as the rest of our fellow Christians in the Western world. The purpose is to commemorate a sacred event—not to make a particular day sacred.
Have Theology, Will argue: wire Metacrock
Buy My book: The Trace of God: Warrant for belief
User avatar
Metacrock
 
Posts: 9924
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 8:03 am
Location: Dallas

Re: The First easter

Postby SayaOtonashi on Mon Mar 20, 2017 4:56 pm

Thanks. One thing is my friend keeps saying but Jesus didn't say to remember his resurrection. But didn't he say to proclaim his resurrection?
SayaOtonashi
 
Posts: 40
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 12:16 am

Re: The First easter

Postby Metacrock on Wed Mar 22, 2017 8:20 am

SayaOtonashi wrote:Thanks. One thing is my friend keeps saying but Jesus didn't say to remember his resurrection. But didn't he say to proclaim his resurrection?

he said where ever you are going(go therefore into all the world) preach the gospel, that;s paret of the gospel.
Have Theology, Will argue: wire Metacrock
Buy My book: The Trace of God: Warrant for belief
User avatar
Metacrock
 
Posts: 9924
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 8:03 am
Location: Dallas

Re: The First easter

Postby SayaOtonashi on Wed Mar 22, 2017 12:03 pm

I hope no one thinks I'm not stupid I just like to figure things out. So according to many outside the mindstream, Jesus rose on Sunday but the sabbath.

https://www.ucg.org/files/image/article ... add-up.png

Why is it so har dto accept a sunday ?
SayaOtonashi
 
Posts: 40
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 12:16 am

Re: The First easter

Postby Metacrock on Thu Mar 23, 2017 3:13 am

you hope no one thinks you are not stupid?

I hope people think i;m not stupid.
Have Theology, Will argue: wire Metacrock
Buy My book: The Trace of God: Warrant for belief
User avatar
Metacrock
 
Posts: 9924
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 8:03 am
Location: Dallas

Previous

Return to Theology/Bible

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests